Looking ahead to the next International Day Against DRM - May 6, 2015

On May 6, 2015, the global anti-DRM community will hold our biggest display of unity so far - the 9th annual International Day Against DRM.

This year's International Day Against DRM featured a variety of events in Brazil, Bangladesh, Portugal, and the United States, and we're planning for 2015's Day to be even bigger.

Get your friends together for the International Day Against DRM (May 6, 2014)

During the last year, we've seen Digital Restrictions Management creep farther into the world of technology (including coffee makers and cars), even as we build a stronger and stronger community to fight it. A growing number of people are living within a box constrained by DRM without even knowing it.

Don't let the MPAA buy the Web

Last week, the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) became a paying and governing member of World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) (no, seriously).

If there were any doubts that W3C was in bed with Big Hollywood, now it couldn't be more obvious. Together, W3C, the MPAA, and a handful of the world's most powerful web companies are preparing to build Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) deep into our public Web standards. We must stop them.

Give freely this Cyber Monday: Introducing the 2013 Giving Guide

On Cyber Monday, millions of Americans will take to the Internet
in search of the newest gadgets to bestow upon their loved ones.
Most of these "gifts" are trojan horses that will spy on their
recipients, prevent them from doing what they want with their
device, or maybe even block access to their favorite books or
music.

New iPhones put more polish on Apple's restrictions

The announcement of Apple's new iPhone releases marks yet another highly anticipated product launch from the technology giant. As expected, the new iPhones will be faster, more powerful, and continue to hide the various anti-user restrictions behind a sleek and seductive user interface. Each release of a product or operating system from Apple means the latest and greatest they have to offer, including the strongest Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) technologies yet.

Customers streaming away from Netflix

Remember Turn off the TV Week? A chance each summer to switch off the boob tube, recover from brain rot, and maybe even spend some extra time out in the sunshine? This summer, we have an even better reason to spend less time in front of a screen: the video streaming giant Netflix is collaborating with the World Wide Web Consortium to destroy Web freedom.

Oscar awarded to W3C for Best Supporting Role in "The Hollyweb"

In celebration of International Day Against DRM today, we rolled out the red carpet at W3C to deliver your petition signatures. Internet freedom's most stylish gathered to present W3C with an award for "Best Supporting Role in 'The Hollyweb'," accompanied by over 22,500 verified signatures from members of the public who oppose a proposal that would weave Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) into the fabric of the Web.

Show your friends you care about freedom from DRM; use a banner on your social media profile

Stop DRM in HTML banner photo

The fight to keep DRM out of HTML is heating up. This Friday, Defective by Design will pay a visit to the Cambridge, MA, office of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to hand-deliver our petition against the Encrypted Media Extensions proposal (EME).

This Friday is International Day Against DRM

International Day Against DRM is this Friday, May 3rd. People all over the world are going to be showing their opposition to DRM, and you can join them!

Organize a local event today and we'll help you promote it. An event can be as simple as tabling at your campus, handing out information at a library or bookstore that offers ebooks with DRM. Find out if there's a local event near you. If there isn't, get one started!

Defective by Design and allies condemn proposal for building Digital Restrictions Management into the Web

Stop the Hollyweb! No DRM in HTML5.

Today Defective by Design, through the Free Software Foundation, joined twenty-six other organizations in releasing a joint letter to the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), the Web's standards-setting body, condemning Encrypted Media Extensions (EME).

Tell W3C: We don't want the Hollyweb

Hollywood is at it again. Its latest ploy to take over the Web? Use its influence at the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) to weave Digital Restrictions Management (DRM) into HTML5 — in other words, into the very fabric of the Web. Millions of Internet users came together to defeat SOPA/PIPA, but now Big Media moguls are going through non-governmental channels to try to sneak digital restrictions into every interaction we have online.

New and improved label for DRM-free files

Soon after announcing the big expansion and complete overhaul of our Guide to DRM-free Living, we also announced the DRM-free label, an effort to create recognizable branding for providers of DRM-free files to quickly communicate to users that they don't have to worry about being encumbered by restrictive technologies such as Digital Restrictions Management.

Popular self-publishing and book printing company, Lulu, drops DRM

Online self-publishing platforms have lowered barriers for authors to get their works published, giving rise to a new kind of literature that works without big publishers. Lulu is one of the most popular solutions for writers to easily sell their works in print or as ebooks. A few years ago, they defended their DRM-encumbered ebooks, but they have just announced that they are saying goodbye to DRM.

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