Amazon Product Tagging Campaign

One of the most important steps in fighting DRM is making sure people know that products have DRM. Unfortunately, Amazon doesn't tell people this, so we make use of their tagging functionality to help label products that are infected.

If you're getting involved with tagging, please do two things:
  • Make use of the Defectivebydesign tag forum.
  • Tag things 'drmfree' if they don't contain DRM. Be careful who you are tagging, and bear in mind that if you incorrectly tag things, it can make our efforts less powerful.

We've got two easy ways for you to have a major impact in just 5 minutes (but this is so much fun it might suck you in for hours!).

Amazon.com, perhaps the largest internet retailer, has a system of "tagging" products on its US site. You can look at a product and add a tag that describes it. We have started tagging items that contain DRM (Blu-Ray players and DVDs, the Zune, the iPod and more) with the "defectivebydesign" tag.

As products get tagged over and over again with a particular tag, that tag surfaces to the top of the list, and displays in larger text in some views. There is also a page for pictures and discussions of the tag. Get tagging these DRM products now!

All the international Amazon websites allow customers to review products. Review a DRM product NOW as a way to warn others of the problems they may face because of DRM. If you see a product review that points out the DRM problems you can also rate that review so others will see it.

Your participation will ensure that thousands of products get tagged and reviewed, and hundreds of thousands of consumers, maybe millions, will be warned about DRM. Nice!

Now we don't want to encourage you to get an Amazon account if you don't already have one*, but if you do have an acount, then here is a chance for you to use it for the benefit of others. Log in now, start searching and start tagging!

* We do not advocate the use of Amazon, or the creation of Amazon accounts for the purpose of shopping, there are serious privacy concerns about how Amazon collects data from users through their click stream and shopping habits.

Page Type: